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anitaleocadia:

Jeremy Mann

Website/Facebook

- ”Rooftops in the Snow”, 2014

- “Winter, New York”, 2014

- “Down Through the Fog”, 2013

grimelords:

it’s crazy that no one ever talks about that computer in an empty house in germany that’s been quietly generating the world’s supply of trance music since 1994

eastflatbush:

i sell unbelievable combs.

eastflatbush:

i sell unbelievable combs.

(Source: coongod)


drawing-bored:

john brosio’s tornado series, acrylics on canvas. so much love.


awkwardsituationist:

light pollution is largely the result poorly designed lighting, which wastes energy shining outward to the sky, where it is unwanted, instead of downwards to the ground, where it is needed. billions are spent each year on unshielded outdoor lights, though they are directly responsible for 14.7 million tons of carbon dioxide waste in the u.s. alone.

our overlit cities and suburbs have radically altered the light rhythms to which many forms of life, including diurnal animals such as ourselves, have adapted, disrupting the migratory, reproductive and feeding cycles of nocturnal creatures in potentially devastating ways.

light, for example, makes nocturnal animals easier prey, and acts as a magnet for birds, with the latter effect so powerful that scientists speak of some birds being literally “captured” by searchlights, circling in the thousands until they drop. the effect was notably observed in new york’s tribute of lights.

the effect on humans is just as profound. darkness is not only essential to our biological welfare (with light pollution linked to breast and prostate cancer), but the light of the stars and the rhythms of day and night is part our collective evolutionary and cultural patrimony. yet, two thirds of humanity live under skies polluted with light, while one fifth of the planet can no longer see the milky way.

photos by jim richardson from his series “death of night,” to consider during earth hour, which is saturday, march 29 at 8:30pm.

1ucasvb:

Radians: the natural way of measuring angles

Awesome! I wish I had seen this back in high school. Or I guess I wish I had the internet back in high school? But then maybe I wouldn’t have graduated from high school because I’d be on the Internet and not learning math, except in this one case.
(There’s a bunch of good animations on his page, worth a look).

1ucasvb:

Radians: the natural way of measuring angles

Awesome! I wish I had seen this back in high school. Or I guess I wish I had the internet back in high school? But then maybe I wouldn’t have graduated from high school because I’d be on the Internet and not learning math, except in this one case.

(There’s a bunch of good animations on his page, worth a look).

Cyanogen

Cyanogen is trying to go mainstream but I still don’t get it. I mean I understand it, but I don’t get what the appeal will be to the average person. The improvements seem too low level to be worth the effort for most people. The UI improvements seem to be limited to shortcuts and gestures, which I’m not sure Android needs more of, but either way doesn’t seem to provide enough incentive to risk it all installing a new ROM. Android has always had a hardcore technical user base (just look at the top paid apps), but what they want is very different than the average user. Reaching 10 million users is amazing, but that sounds like roughly the size of that hardcore audience, and I can’t imagine any way it’ll become mainstream. Perhaps it doesn’t need to go fully mainstream to be a big business?


We wrote a ton of apps for the Sidekick/HipTop. Something like 45 total and we just loved every minute of it. Danger is overlooked because it’s phone was only popular with teens, but to say that they were ahead of their time is a real understatement.

Tech is not “shit to buy”

Quartz thinks 2013 was a “lost year in tech”, and the summary of their thinking is that there were no breakthrough products. This feels familiar. Remember the end of innovation pieces around 2000? Everything on the internet had been done, and innovation was dead forever, and so on. Of course we were only just beginning to feel the effects of the internet. To think that we’d have seen it all, a mere five years in, is ridiculous. And so here we have Quartz saying the same thing roughly five years into the mobile revolution, which is of course just getting started even though we’ve all got Angry Birds and Instagram. All of this lead me to these thoughts: 

1. Tech does not equal “shit to buy.” It does not exist to make you go to Best Buy. Just because you don’t have something new in a belt pouch or cargo pant pocket this year is not a failure of technology. However, huge sections of the industry are basically operating on this model. This is what causes Samsung to make that watch thing they’re trying to sell during football games.

2. Technology is something different when it’s cheap. An $800 smartphone is one thing, an $80 smartphone is basically something different. Smart phones look like they’re going to get everyone on the internet, and that really just got going in 2013. The sum of human knowledge available to all people at all times, ya blew it 2013!

3. Remember software is eating the world? Who gives a shit that we didn’t have a new breakthrough shiny rectangle, we have millions of new things available to download on a moments notice. Software is where most of the interesting stuff happens. Think of how many amazing things you were able to do on the same old boring laptop over the last decade. Innovation is dead, I still have the same keyboard!

To quote Louis C.K., again, five years later - “Everything is amazing and nobody is happy.”


Matt Hall, co-founder of Docracy and Larva Labs.